Achimenes meaning, synonyms, antonyms, translation, and use cases

Achimenes

In today’s word for the day, we will highlight on the meaning of Achimenes, its synonyms, antonyms, translation, and use cases.

Meaning

The Gesneriaceae genus Achimenes contains roughly 25 species of rhizomatous perennial herbs native to tropical and subtropical regions. They go by a variety of popular names, including hot water plants, widow’s tears, magic flowers, and Cupid’s bower.

Where to Plant Achimenes

Achimenes are gorgeous bloomer that is generally planted as a flowering houseplant in hanging baskets or mixed pots, despite the fact that it is a perennial in hardiness zones 10–11. Achimenes are related to African Violets and prefer more temperate weather than what is typically found outside. They thrive in locations with dappled sunlight or light to partial shade.

When to Plant Achimenes

In the spring, plant your Achimenes bulbs. Usually by early summer, the plants will start to sprout 2 to 4 weeks after planting and will soon produce magnificent blossoms. From late spring through fall, the blossoms will still look stunning as they spill over the sides of hanging baskets and other containers.

How to Plant Achimenes

  • Select a location where your Achimenes will experience dappled sunlight or light to moderate shade.
  • Choose a container with at least one drainage hole, then add a fine, quick-draining soil to it. Almost any potting mix that is sold commercially will work.
  • Place the bulbs in tiny holes that are 3 to 4 inches apart and 3/4 to 1 inch deep. They will gladly grow from any position, so don’t bother about which side is upward.
  • After planting, soak the soil to let it settle around the bulbs.

How to Grow Achimenes

  • During periods of active development, keep the soil damp but not wet. The plants will complete blooming and enter dormancy if left to dry out.
  • To keep your plants blooming vigorously throughout the summer and early fall, add a half-strength liquid or water-soluble fertilizer to the water.
  • When the stem tips are about 3″ long, pinch them back to promote branching and make the plant fuller with more blooms.
  • If you want to give your Achimenes a fresh start before starting the next growing cycle, remove the foliage when the leaves turn yellow and die back in the fall.
  • If you want to conserve the bulbs for later use and live in a place that is cooler than zone 10, dig up the bulbs and store them in slightly moist peat moss.

Cultivation

In subtropical areas, Achimenes species and hybrids are frequently grown as greenhouse plants or as outdoor bedding plants. The species have undergone considerable hybridization, with A. grandiflora and A. longiflora playing a large role in many of the resulting offspring. Many of the species and their hybrids are used as decorative greenhouse and bedding plants because they feature enormous, vividly colored blooms. As long as the essential conditions are met—a rich, well-drained soil that is on the acidic side, bright indirect sunshine, warmth, constant wetness, and high humidity—they are typically simple to grow. They go dormant throughout the winter and spend the season as scaly rhizomes, which must be kept dry until they resprout in the spring. Some of the species and their hybrids are moderately hardy and can be grown outdoors year-round in zone 8, or even zone 7 with protection.

How to Grow Achimenes Magic Flowers

Most often, this lovely bloom is planted as a summer container plant. Achimenes longiflora prefer temperatures of 60 degrees F, although they require temperatures of at least 50 degrees F (10 C) at night (16 C.). This plant thrives best during the daytime hours in the mid-seventies (24 C.). Plants should be placed in artificial or bright, indirect light. In the fall, flowers will start to fade, and the plant will go into dormancy and start to grow tubers. Both in the soil and at stem nodes, these tubers develop. You can collect tubers to plant next year once the plant’s leaves have completely fallen off. Put the tubers in containers or bags of soil or vermiculite and keep them between 50 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit (10-21 C.). Plant the tubers 1 to 2.5 cm deep in the springtime. By the start of the summer, seeds will grow, and soon after, blossoms will appear. For optimal results, use African violet potting soil.

 

Synonyms

  • hot water plant

Antonyms

  • earthly pant

 

Use cases

  • Achimenes is a genus of herbs native to tropical America (family Gesneriaceae) that are frequently grown for its gloxinia-like flowers.
  • Achimenes are stove bulbs, thus they require a lot of heat to flourish.
  • The Gesneriaceae genus Achimenes contains roughly 25 species of rhizomatous perennial herbs native to tropical and subtropical regions.

 

Translation

Spanish- Achimenes
Greek- Αχιμένης
Latin- Achimenes
French- Achimène
Portugese- Aquimenes

 

Frequently asked question

How do you take care of Achimenes?

Growing Achimenes. During periods of active development, keep the soil damp but not wet. The plants will complete blooming and enter dormancy if left to dry out. To keep your plants blooming vigorously throughout the summer and early fall, add a half-strength liquid or water-soluble fertilizer to the water.

How do you grow Achimenes bulbs?

Plant the rhizomes 1-2cms deep and with up to 5 rhizomes in a 13cm pot, smaller pots can of course be used when planting 1-3 rhizomes. If the achimenes are kept in an excessively warm environment (above 20 C ) they can grow very leggy.

Why is it called hot water plant?

These are known as the “Hot-water plant” simply because they are frequently watered with warm water. They prefer warmth and bright light but not searing direct sun. A prudent decision given that their greatest risk comes from mold growth in cold, moist circumstances. For growth, a temperature of 60F/17C is necessary.

Are Achimenes perennial?

Achimenes is a gorgeous bloomer that is generally planted as a flowering houseplant in hanging baskets or mixed pots, despite the fact that it is a perennial in hardiness zones 10–11. Achimenes are related to African Violets and prefer more temperate weather than what is typically found outside.

How often should I water Ctenanthe?

Try watering once or twice a week, but always examine the soil to determine whether it needs watering. When the plant isn’t actively developing during the winter, you should water it less frequently and with tepid or room temperature water. Drainage is crucial for all plants, just like it is.

Which bulbs grow quickly?

Of all the bulbs you can grow indoors, the delicate, fragrant paperwhite narcissus (Narcissus ‘Paperwhite’) is possibly the easiest and fastest to flower. Currently on offer are paperwhite narcissus bulbs, which with the promise of dazzling mahogany onions.

 

Video explanation on Achimenes

This video will give you a further explanation on the meaning of achimenes

 

Summary

African violet-related plants called Achimenes longiflora are also referred to as hot water plants, mother’s tears, cupid’s bow, and magic flower, which is its most popular name. This fascinating rhizomatous perennial species is native to Mexico and blooms from summer to October. Achimenes care is also simple.

Comments

comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *