Acidogenesis meaning, synonyms, antonyms, translation, and use cases

Acidogenic

In today’s word for the day, we will highlight the meaning of acidogensis, its synonyms, antonyms, translation, and use cases.

Meaning:

The fermentation process known as acidogenesis occurs when acidogenic bacteria break down the hydrolyzed compounds (soluble organic monomers of sugars and amino acids) to create alcohols, aldehydes, volatile fatty acids (VFAs), and acetate along with H2 and CO2.

Ammonia gas is also released during the breakdown of amino acids (NH3). Both stringent and facultative anaerobes are capable of producing acidogenic bacteria.

Clostridium, Bacteroides, Ruminococcus, Butyribacterium, Propionibacterium, Eubacterium, Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Pseudomonas, Desulfobacter, Micrococcus, Bacillus, and Escherichia are just a few of the many fermentative genera and species that are present throughout the acidogenic stage.

Acidogenesis is the fermentation stage where the products of hydrolysis (soluble organic monomers of sugars and amino acids) are degraded by acidogenic bacteria to produce alcohols, aldehydes, and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and acetate together with H2 and CO2.

What is acidogenic fermentation

The process of converting soluble organic compounds into organic acids like acetic, propionic, butyric, and lactic acid as well as other fermentation products like alcohols and hydrogen is known as acidogenic fermentation.

This process is the first step in the anaerobic digestion of organic compounds to methane and carbon dioxide (also known as biogas).

Acidogenesis is the second stage in the four stages of anaerobic digestion:

  • Hydrolysis: A chemical reaction where particulates are solubilized and large polymers converted into simpler monomers;
  • Acidogenesis: A biological reaction where simple monomers are converted into volatile fatty acids;
  • Acetogenesis: A biological reaction where volatile fatty acids are converted into acetic acid, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen
  • Methanogenesis: A biological reaction where acetates are converted into methane and carbon dioxide, while hydrogen is consumed.

A group of bacteria work together in the complex biochemical process known as anaerobic digestion to break down organic substances into methane and carbon dioxide. It is a stabilizing technique that also reduces germs, odor, and bulk.

Early in the 20th century, acidogenic activity was discovered, but it wasn’t until the middle of the 1960s that engineering of phases separation was anticipated to enhance stability and waste digester treatment .

In this stage, hydrolytic enzymes depolymerize complex molecules (proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) into soluble chemicals (cellulases, hemicelulases, amylases, lipases and proteases).

The hydrolyzed substances are fermented to produce neutral substances (ethanol, methanol), ammonia, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide as well as volatile fatty acids (acetate, propionate, butyrate, and lactate).

One of the primary processes at this stage is acetogenesis, in which the intermediary metabolites produced are converted by the three major bacterial groups to acetate, hydrogen, and carbonic gas.

  • homoacetogens;
  • syntrophes; and
  • sulphoreductors.

For the acetic acid production are considered three kinds of bacteria:

  • Clostridium aceticum;
  • Acetobacter woodii; and
  • Clostridium termoautotrophicum.

 

Synonyms

  • acid forming

 

Antonyms

  • non-acid formation
  • non-alcoholic

 

Translation

Spanish- acidogénico
Greek- οξεογόνος
Latin- acidogenic
Portugese- acidogênico
French- acidogène

 

Use cases

  • Acidogenic digestate gives soils organic content and moisture retention.
  • Compared to methanogenic bacteria, acidogensis bacteria create organic acids and grow and reproduce more quickly.
  • Acidogenic digestate is fibrous and contains lignin and cellulose, two components of structural plant matter.
  • High moisture retention qualities are present in acidogenic digestate.
  • After an acidogenic challenge, remineralization happens every day thanks to saliva.
  • Acidogenic yeast and bacteria still carry out fermentation, but it is less pronounced than with other processes.
  • The biological process of acidogenesis causes acidogenic (fermentative) bacteria to further degrade the remaining components.
  • The sugars and amino acids are subsequently converted by acidogenic bacteria into carbon dioxide, hydrogen, ammonia, and organic acids.
  • Utilizing carbon sources that are currently underutilized in the acidogenic process to produce more biogas maintains the technique’s practical relevance.
  • By regularly consuming fermentable dietary carbohydrates, the shift to an acidogenic, aciduric, and cariogenic microbial community develops and is sustained.

 

Video explanation on Acidogenic

This video will give you a further explanation on the meaning of acidogensis

 

Summary

Phosphorus was more readily available when conditions were acidic due to acidogenic fermentation.

During drying, ammonium volatilization was lessened by acidogenic fermentation. Labile carbon rose as a result of acidogenic fermentation. Methanogenic fermentation decreased labile carbon and enhanced ammonium volatilization.

It is the first stage of the anaerobic digestion of organic compounds to produce methane and carbon dioxide (biogas), in which soluble organic compounds are fermented to produce organic acids like acetic, propionic, butyric, and lactic acid as well as other fermentation products like alcohols and hydrogen.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Which bacteria is acidogenic?

Bacteria that can produce acids through their metabolic pathways are known as acidogenic bacteria. Streptococcus mutans is the primary acidogenic or acid-producing bacterial species in relation to tooth caries.

What is meant by acidogenesis?

Acidogenesis is the fermentation stage where the products of hydrolysis (soluble organic monomers of sugars and amino acids) are degraded by acidogenic bacteria to produce alcohols, aldehydes, and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and acetate together with H2 and CO2 (Sambusiti, 2013).

What is acidogenic fermentation?

The process of converting soluble organic compounds into organic acids like acetic, propionic, butyric, and lactic acid as well as other fermentation products like alcohols and hydrogen is known as acidogenic fermentation. This process is the first step in the anaerobic digestion of organic compounds to methane and carbon dioxide (also known as biogas).

What happens in acidogenesis?

In the acidogenic phase, acidogens classes of microbes convert the hydrolyzed simpler molecules, such as amino acids, sugars, peptides, and others into volatile fatty acids. This phase results in the production of alcohols and organic acids (Gerardi, 2003).

How does acidogenic bacteria work?

In the acidogenic phase, acidogens classes of microbes convert the hydrolyzed simpler molecules, such as amino acids, sugars, peptides, and others into volatile fatty acids. This phase results in the production of alcohols and organic acids (Gerardi, 2003).

What is acidogenesis and acetogenesis?

Acidogenesis: A biological reaction where simple monomers are converted into volatile fatty acids; Acetogenesis: A biological reaction where volatile fatty acids are converted into acetic acid, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen.

What are acidogenic amino acids?

Acidogenesis is the fermentation stage where the products of hydrolysis (soluble organic monomers of sugars and amino acids) are degraded by acidogenic bacteria to produce alcohols, aldehydes, and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and acetate together with H2 and CO2 (Sambusiti, 2013).

Comments

comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *