Parabolic mirror meaning, synonyms, antonyms, translation, and use cases

Parabolic mirror

Have you come across the word Parabolic mirror before now, if you have not, in today’s word for the day, we will be giving you highlight on the meaning of parabolic mirror, its synonyms, antonyms, translation, and use cases.

Meaning

A parabolic mirror is a reflective surface that can be used to gather and/or project energy, such as light, sound, or radio waves. It comes in the form of a circular paraboloid, or the surface formed by a parabola rotating around its axis.

A concave mirror that has been specifically designed to catch and concentrate energy on a particular area is known as a parabolic mirror. However, they are solely employed to move energy from one place to another. Utilizing a concave reflecting surface, energy or radiation such as light, sound, or radiofrequency is transmitted as well as collected.

Astronomical telescopes frequently use parabolic mirrors to lessen spherical aberration and enhance image clarity.

Employing parabolic mirrors

In the following applications, parabolic mirrors are used:

  • Solar ovens.
  • Mirror telescope.
  • Dish satellites

Consequently, a parabolic mirror is one that has been specifically engineered to collect and concentrate energy on a single spot. Additionally, they are used to move energy from one place to another.

 

Synonyms

  • parabolic collector
  • parabolic reflector
  • parabolic reflectors
  • paraboloidal mirror
  • parabolic dish
  • parabolic reflector antenna
  • parabolic reflector assembly
  • paraboloidal reflector
  • reflector dish

 

Antonyms

  • parabolic deflector
  • deflector dish
  • parabolic rejecter

 

Translation

Many languages have its pronunciation for this word, but here we will take a look at some of the ways some world languages pronounce it.

French: miroir parabolique

Hebrew: מראה פרבולית

Romanian: oglinda parabolica

Punjabi: ਪੈਰਾਬੋਲਿਕ ਸ਼ੀਸ਼ਾ (Pairābōlika śīśā)

Greek: παραβολικός καθρέφτης (paravolikós kathréftis)

Chinese (Simplified): 抛物面镜 (Pāowùmiàn jìng)

Arabic: (murat mukafia) مرآة مكافئة

Somali: muraayad parabolic

Hungarian: parabola tükör

Swedish: parabolisk spegel

 

Use cases

  • A parabolic mirror is a reflective surface that can be used to gather and/or project energy, such as light, sound, or radio waves. It comes in form of a circular paraboloid, or the surface formed by a parabola rotating around its axis.
  • A parabolic mirror has an outer edge that is notably different from that of a spherical mirror in terms of shape. Images created by parabolic mirrors are sharp and clear, lacking the blurriness that characterizes images from spherical mirrors.
  • The parabolic mirror has a converging power which enables it to focus the light shining on it at a specific location. Clear visibility is provided by these mirrors in the dark and even during foggy evenings. Parabolic mirrors have a converging nature.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

What kind of mirror is a parabolic mirror?

A curved or concave mirror with a cross-section resembling the parabola’s tip. The surface of the mirror reflects the majority of the light, radio waves, sound, and other radiation that enters the mirror directly, directing it toward the parabola’s focus where, due to its concentration, it may be clearly detected.

The parabolic mirror was invented by whom?

In 1888, a German physicist that goes by the name of Heinrich Hertz built the first parabolic reflector antenna. The antenna was a spark-gap driven 26 cm dipole that served as the feed antenna along the focal line. It was a cylindrical parabolic reflector made of zinc sheet metal and supported by a wooden frame.

What benefit does a parabolic mirror provide?

Superior directivity

The parabolic reflector or dish antenna can offer high levels of directivity, just like it does with the gain. The beam-width narrows to meet with the steady increment of the gain.  This is considered to be of huge benefit in applications where only a little amount of electricity is needed to be directed.

Functions of parabolic mirror?

In optics, parabolic mirrors are used in flashlights, searchlights, stage spotlights, and automobile headlights to both gather light in reflecting telescopes and solar furnaces and to project a beam of light.

Why does a parabolic mirror produce a brighter image than a regular face mirror?

A parabolic mirror has an outer edge that is notably different from that of a spherical mirror in terms of shape. Images created by parabolic mirrors are sharp and clear, lacking the blurriness that characterizes images from spherical mirrors.

A parabolic mirror can only get so heated, right?

3,500 °C

Light is concentrated onto a focal point (Insolation) by parabolic mirrors or heliostats. The focal point may reach a temperature of 3,500 °C (6,330 °F), and this heat can be utilized to create nanomaterial, melt steel, and produce hydrogen fuel.

Can a spoon be considered to be a parabolic mirror?

A spoon can be considered this is because a silver spoon is shiny with a well curved shape and is smooth, hence, it can reveal light from its surface in other for it to be able to reflect images bright and clearly. The reflection is more distinct and the generated image is clearer depending on how shiny the spoon is.

Why the use of parabolic reflectors in automobile headlights?

The reflector in the car’s headlamps comes in the form of a parabolic concave mirror with light. The parabolic mirror has a converging power which enables it to focus the light shining on it at a specific location. Clear visibility is provided by these mirrors in the dark and even during foggy evenings. Parabolic mirrors have a converging nature.

What drawbacks do parabolic mirror antennas have?

Disadvantages: The parabolic reflector has some restrictions and disadvantages, much like any other kind of antenna: Requires a reflector and a drive element: The antenna’s parabolic reflector is merely one component. At the parabolic reflector’s focus, a feed system must be installed.

 

Video Explanation of Parabolic mirror

This video will give you a further explanation of the meaning of the parabolic mirror.

 

Summary

Reflecting telescopes, searchlights, and headlights use parabolic mirrors, which are concave mirrors with a paraboloid of revolution as their shape, to ensure that rays coming from the geometric focus and reflected from the surface are all parallel to one another and to the axis of symmetry and that rays from a distant source (such as a star) are reflected to the focus.

It is also worthy of noting that the outside edge of a parabolic mirror is also noticeably different in shape from that of a spherical mirror. Instead of being hazy like spherical mirror images, the images produced by parabolic mirrors are sharp and clear.

However the major setback with this mirror is that like any other type of antenna, the parabolic reflector has some limitations and drawbacks. The antenna’s parabolic reflector is just one part; it also needs a reflector and a driving element. The focus of the parabolic reflector requires the installation of a feed system.

 

Comments

comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *